Aviation experts call for prison sentences for drones operators





Aviation experts have called for prison sentences for people who fly drones too close to manned aircraft. The call came after it was revealed a helicopter and passenger plane had near misses with pilotless devices.
One drone forced a Royal Navy Lynx helicopter to swerve and another came within 50 metres of a passenger plane.
Both incidents happened in the same week and are just the latest in a growing number reported by pilots.
In a report released on Friday the UK Airprox Board (UKAB) said: “This type of incident between manned aircraft and unmanned systems are becoming more prevalent and the next incident might not be a near miss but a collision.”
Neither drone operator has been traced but the report says those who are caught should be treated in the same way as people shining laser pens at pilots.
Last year, two men from Walsall in the West Midlands were jailed for three and four months for attacking a police helicopter.
And commenting on the two near misses, the report said: “This was a similar issue to laser attacks, and should be treated in a similar manner.”
It added: “Anecdotal evidence indicated that when some incidents had been recently reported, the receiving police force had either not responded or had not known what to do with the information.”
The UKAB, which works to improve air safety, is funded by the UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and the UK Military Aviation Authority (MAA).
It said the most serious drone near miss this year involved a Navy helicopter which was descending from 2,500ft, about 11 nautical miles north east of Bristol airport, when the pilot spotted a small white drone, or unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), between 100m and 200m ahead.
Aviation experts have called for prison sentences for people who fly drones too close to manned aircraft.
The call came after it was revealed a helicopter and passenger plane had near misses with pilotless devices.
One drone forced a Royal Navy Lynx helicopter to swerve and another came within 50 metres of a passenger plane.
Both incidents happened in the same week and are just the latest in a growing number reported by pilots.
In a report released on Friday the UK Airprox Board (UKAB) said: “This type of incident between manned aircraft and unmanned systems are becoming more prevalent and the next incident might not be a near miss but a collision.”
Neither drone operator has been traced but the report says those who are caught should be treated in the same way as people shining laser pens at pilots.
Last year, two men from Walsall in the West Midlands were jailed for three and four months for attacking a police helicopter.
And commenting on the two near misses, the report said: “This was a similar issue to laser attacks, and should be treated in a similar manner.”
It added: “Anecdotal evidence indicated that when some incidents had been recently reported, the receiving police force had either not responded or had not known what to do with the information.”
The UKAB, which works to improve air safety, is funded by the UK Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and the UK Military Aviation Authority (MAA).
It said the most serious drone near miss this year involved a Navy helicopter which was descending from 2,500ft, about 11 nautical miles north east of Bristol airport, when the pilot spotted a small white drone, or unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), between 100m and 200m ahead.
Source: Mirror